Bullies will be bullies

Bullies will be bullies

Trump is a bully, and he’s a good bully, as in he’s really good at being a bully. Bullies don’t listen to argument, far from it. They don’t need a good argument or any kind of good reasoning. A bully bullies, that’s what they do. That’s how they get things done. They bully until they get their way. That technique works great in middle school and in high school, and soon falls to the way side and the bully becomes what he truly is, a dull-minded idiot. However when the bully has always been protected by money, or at least the mirage of money, then he gets to get away with it through adulthood. People are awed by large amounts of money. They let themselves be bullied when there’s a juicy carrot at the end of the stick. That he continues to get away with it decades into his life after having failed to deliver the carrot time and time again, is unbelievably crazy to me. That just goes to prove that a large majority of our electorate are a bunch of dull-minded idiots. The same gullible dullards who keep buying into quick-money-making schemes time and time again, losing their money every single time, and going for it time and time again. If you put your hand through those bars, that snake is gonna bite you. Really? Yup, I promise you. Okay, are you sure? Try it. Okay. Yup, that snake bit me, and it hurts. The following week. You think that snake is gonna bit me again, if I put my hand through those bars? I don’t know....
What I have time for

What I have time for

This last week was my birthday. I turned 45 years old. I spent my birthday at my day job painting shelves. We’re opening a new restaurant, and I was lucky enough to meet the owners in July. They hired me to be the Wine & Liquor Director, and we’ve all been working really hard trying to get The Beer Plant opened. While working a few days ago, I listened to two episodes of the TED Radio Hour, Slowing Down and Shifting Time. These two episodes really spoke to me. I’ve been slow my whole life. It simply takes me longer to get anything done, to go through important hurdles in life. I’m slow. I procrastinate a lot. Every once in a while, I get something done. My poem Blueberry Hill took me 10+ years to write, and I’m still not entirely sure that I’m not going to tweek it some more, for example. Shifting Time in particular, was about our perception of time. How time fluctuates depending on our frame of mind, on our environment, and how we actually create this mysterious thing we call “time” that we often perceive as being out of our control. That’s what I took from this podcast, in any case. Here I am, just five years away from turning fifty years old, and I’m not sure that I’m happy with how I’ve managed my time, and I’m not sure how much time I have left, and however much that is, I’d like to publish a few more books because that makes me happy and content. One of the stories they covered are how...
Taking the Highway in Roads

Taking the Highway in Roads

If you’re a dreamer, and you long for the journey, Roads: Driving America’s Great Highways, by Larry McMurtry is for you. The muse of this book is the highway, not the place of departure, not the place of arrival, but the journey between those two points. In a sense, where one might be heading, and where one comes from, is of little importance. And throughout this journey, the journeys previously lived come back and are lived again all at once, together. It’s as if life itself is a series of building blocks to be constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed ad infinitum, in an infinite never ending puzzle that changes on a whim, is lived at eighty miles an hour, and then stops abruptly. While the journey is happening, there is no end, there is no beginning, there is everything all at once, there is only the highway. In Roads: Driving America’s Great Highways, McMurtry attempts to transcend time itself. That, of course, is not possible. You’d have to travel faster than the speed of light to actually be able to do that. What he achieves is the illusion of bringing his life, the life of other writers, of the various people of America together, as if the highway was the glue that binds centuries of lives, bringing them together by the sheer force of the road traveled. He rarely gets off the highway, he eats at bland nondescript places, sleeps in unnamed motels, leaving first thing in the morning, and avoids all the tourist trappings of rural America. The only thing that matters is the road, the musings the road...
It’s not the story, it’s how you tell it

It’s not the story, it’s how you tell it

The story doesn’t matter. It is all in the application of the words on the page. The way they come together one after the other. What matters is not the story or the plot; what matters is the writing itself, the telling of the story is more important than the story itself. Most writers have to have a story. The greatest writers don’t need a story at all, they can keep you captivated without a narrative. The good, even most of the great writers, need a story, a narrative of some kind to help keep their words together with meaning. The bad writer needs a great narrative, and the better you are, the simpler your narrative can be. The genius writer needs no narrative at all. Most of us are not geniuses. Unfortunately, many a mediocre writer thinks they’re great. It’s mostly delusion. In fact, most writers are barely qualified to write a wedding thank-you card. Those writers, and by those writers I mean 99% of all us writers, need some sort of narrative to hold our thoughts together. When they try to write without a narrative, they fail miserably, and what they put out is no better than public masturbation, which is no fun at all for the audience. Unless, of course, you’re a really good public masturbator. There’s an exception to every rule, otherwise what would be the point? You could be a great masturbator and still be only a descent storyteller, and a horrible writer. As long as you’re good at something, that’s what matters to keep the audience interested. Just to make sure I don’t...