A Negro and An Ofay

A Negro and An Ofay

A Negro and An Ofay, book 1 in Tales of Elliot Caprice Paperback: 288 pages Publisher: Down & Out Books (May 15, 2017) Language: English ISBN-10: 1943402671 ISBN-13: 978-1943402670 A Negro and an Ofay, by Danny Gardner was pretty fucking good. I had a blast reading this book. Every character comes to life, and especially the story’s hero, Elliot Caprice. I’m hooked, I want to read more, though I must say, the author has given himself quite a challenge with this introductory novel, where to go next? I can’t wait to find out. And I’m jealous. Writers who can capture a character’s distinct place in society by his or her voice without being stereotypical or condescending amaze me. Gardner does this really well, and I hate him for it. That’s not true. I admire him for it. Everybody seems to compare Gardner to Walter Mosley and Chester Himes, two writers I enjoy, for the easy reason that he’s a black writer writing about strong multidimensional non-stereotypical hard boiled black characters, and that’s fine and true enough, however I would also compare him to Nelson Algren for his ability to capture a character almost immediately by his voice rather than by long descriptive passages. (I just pulled Algren off the shelf, haven’t read him for possibly years, and I need to make sure I’m not completely talking out of my ass.) One of the traits that made me enjoy “A Negro and an Ofay” as much as I did, is Gardner’s direct non-PC approach to his storytelling. This is the experience of a black man, or a man who is...